dijous 31 d'octubre de 2019

Living in a noisy area increases the risk of suffering a more serious stroke

News from IMIM

The high levels of environmental noise we are subjected to in large cities can increase both the severity and consequences of an ischaemic stroke. More precisely, researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and doctors from Hospital del Mar, together with researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), and Brown University, in the United States, put the increased risk at 30% for people living in noisier areas. In contrast, living close to green areas brings down this risk by up to 25%. This is the first time that these factors have been analysed in relation to stroke severity. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Research.

The researchers looked at the influence of noise levels, air pollution (particularly suspended particles smaller than 2.5 microns; PM2.5), and exposure to green areas on nearly 3,000 ischaemic stroke patients treated at Hospital del Mar between 2005 and 2014. To do this, they used data from the Cartographic Institute of Catalonia, as well as models to analyse atmospheric pollutant levels, the noise map of Barcelona, and satellite images to define areas with vegetation. Also taken into account was the socioeconomic level of the place the patients lived.

 

More information:
IMIM website

Reference:
Rosa Maria Vivanco-Hidalgo, Carla Avellaneda-Gómez, Payam Dadvand, Marta Cirach, Ángel Ois, Alejandra Gómez González, Ana Rodriguez-Campello, Pablo de Ceballos, Xavier Basagaña, Ana Zabalza, Elisa Cuadrado-Godia, Jordi Sunyer, Jaume Roquer, Gregory A.Wellenius. "Association of residential air pollution, noise, and greenspace with initial ischemic stroke severity". Environmental Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2019.108725

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