divendres 28 de juny de 2019

Exposure to air pollution in India is associated with more hypertension in women

News from ISGlobal

Long-term exposure to air pollution has been previously associated with a higher risk of hypertension in high-income countries, where air pollution levels are generally lower than in low- and middle-income countries. A team led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) set out to study this association in India, a lower middle-income country where burdens of air pollution and hypertension are projected to increase. The results show that women exposed to higher levels of air pollution at residence have a higher hypertension prevalence.

The study, performed within the framework of the CHAI project and published in the journal Epidemiology, studied 5,531 adults from 28 peri-urban villages near Hyderabad city, in Southern India. 

Notably, all study participants were exposed to fine particulate matter levels above the 10 μg/m³ limit recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

The results show that an increase of 1μg/m3 in PM2.5 exposure was associated with a 4% increase in hypertension prevalence in women, as well as a higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure –an increase of 1,4 mmHg and 0.87 mmHg, respectively–. In men, the association observed was weaker.

The research indicates that long-term exposure to particulate matter is associated with a higher prevalence of hypertension, regardless of the type of fuel used for cooking.

 

Reference:
Curto A, Wellenius GA, Milà C, Sánchez M, Ranzani O, Marshall JD, Kulkarni B, Bhogadi S, Kinra S, Tonne C Ambient Particulate Air Pollution and Blood Pressure in Peri-urban India. Epidemiology 2019; 30(4): 492-500

More information:
ISGlobal website

Tornar

Comentaris: